Deadly Terrorist Attacks, But Do We Care?

Loud explosions rocked Somalia's capital Mogadishu on 28th of October. There was not one but two car bombs going off in the center of the city, leaving at least 23 people dead and 30 wounded. These attacks are not the first instances of bombings in Mogadishu, where approximately 300 people were killed in terrorist attacks last month. So far the militant Al-Shabaab group has taken the responsibility for the most recent attacks, but there are no confirmations from the regional law enforcement. Al-...
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A Modern Medieval Nightmare

Streets that lack asphalt, houses without water and electricity and whole communities wanting in proper access to schooling and healthcare— while this might sound like a description of a medieval town this is the reality for hundred millions of people in India. The Indian slums are known as prime examples of the economic theory of the poverty traps. What this theory states is that a certain set of factors such as low level of savings, poor education and/or poor healthcare can cause a self-perpet...
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The Humanitarian Cost of the Mosul Offensive

The Mosul offensive is the biggest ground operation in Iraq since the 2003 U.S-led invasion. The second phase of the nearly twelve-week long campaign to drive ISIS out of its last major stronghold in Iraq began last Thursday. The Islamic State has been using Mosul’s urban landscape and its large civilian population of 1.5 million as a cover to maneuver and launch attacks undetected. Although vastly outnumbered by Elite Iraqi Troops in Mosul, ISIS militants still maintain full control of the terr...
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Avoiding the Revisionist Trap: A Look at Fidel Castro’s Legacy

It is extraordinarily rare that one gets to reflect on the life of a figure who has fundamentally altered the course of world history, and the death of Fidel Castro is one such occasion. Castro was one of the last living reminders of an era marked by the unending battle between Capitalism and Communism – he stood as the leader of a country that plagued American foreign policy and placated our enemies for decades. He also led a regime that victimized its own people and spent fifty years at the he...
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Washington, It’s Time to Start Worrying About Turkey

The Republic of Turkey has long been an important ally for the United States, occupying an extraordinarily strategic geographic location as the bridge between the Middle East and Europe. Established in 1923, Turkey was the successor to the Ottoman Empire, the majority of which had been split up between France and Great Britain in the aftermath of the First World War. Mustafa Kamal Atatürk, a military commander who had helped achieve an Ottoman victory at the Battle of Gallipoli, led the Turkish ...
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Royal Rumble in Thailand?

Last Thursday, King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand died in a hospital in Bangkok at the age of 88. Bhumpipol, who had reigned since 1946, was revered by many Thais. Although the monarchy does not run the country (administrative duties have been carried about by General Prayuth Chan-ocha since he took power in a military coup in May 2014), the monarchy has been seen as a unifying force in a country that pre-coup had a very divisive political environment. The next-in-line to the throne, Cro...
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Why a Nuclear Iran isn’t the End of the World

     On July 14th, 2015, negotiations in Vienna on Iran’s nuclear weapons program came to an end, resulting in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). The United States,  United Kingdom, France, Germany, Russia, China, and the European Union had finally pressured the Islamic Republic into a diplomatic compromise with the hopes of preventing a nuclear arms race in the Middle East. The international sanctions regime, which prohibited the sale of Iranian oil and froze Iranian assets abroad,...
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Baghdad Green Zone Breach Highlights Deeper Sectarian Concerns

In the Iraqi capital, the “Green Zone” has been considered a relatively safe haven from the chaos and turmoil that have plagued the nation since the US invasion in 2003. Sectarian violence has been a staple of Baghdadi life as Sunni and Shiite factions vie for control over Iraq’s government. Early Saturday, an ISIS car bomb went off just east of the capital, killing 21 and wounding at least 42 others. The Sunni terrorist group was reportedly targeting Shiite pilgrims travelling to holy sites ...
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While US Tightens Sanctions, North Korea Continues Unfazed

On Tuesday, President Obama signed an executive order imposing even more sanctions against the DPRK for its continued violations of the six-party talks. In response to these and UN sanctions, Kim Jong-Un ordered nuclear missile tests to come in the near future. Today, North Korea also announced that American Otto Warmbier has been sentenced to fifteen years of hard labor. Warmbier, a student at UVA, was arrested in January at the end of his holiday trip to the DPRK for “perpetrating a host...
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16 dead after militants attack Grand Bassam beach resort

On Sunday, six armed militants killed fourteen civilians and two soldiers in an attack on Grand Bassam, an Ivory Coast beach resort popular among Westerners and located only 25 miles from the capital, Abidjan.   According to a witness, the attackers were “heavily armed and wearing balaclavas” and “fired at guests at L’Etoile du Sud, a large hotel which was full of expats in the current heatwave.”  Photos posted by other witnesses on Twitter showed the assailants toting machine guns and a sign...
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